potatoes: peeled, boiled, mashed, enriched…

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Mashed potatoes: a no-brainer?
Yes – it’s easy, but heavenly delicious when home-made…
(I think that’s why you’ll find again & again “how to do mashed potatoes!” on food blogs around the world…)

 

We start with potatoes & create a simple basic potato mash: afterwards – or better: during the enrichment phase – you may add additional ingredients & flavors. I’ll give you 2 examples so far… (more may follow soon).

I referred to mashed potatoes several times since I started my food blog (think of roast beef dinner) & I think it’s time to be serious about mashed potatoes now.

We need potatoes – no: we need floury potatoes! This is the main criterion for potatoes to qualify for mashed potatoes – so: never use any waxy potatoes!

We peel the potatoes, wash them, cut them into pieces & boil them in salty water. Floury potatoes get rather soon rather soft & crumble away – that’s fine! As soon as you notice drain the potatoes & put them back on the hot pot – at once.

Then it’s all about mashing: I use a masher to crush the potatoes & afterwards I use a special wire whisk with little balls at the wire endings (to get all potato bits hiding in edges…).

 

For the record:
Mashing potatoes is a handmade affair!
If you use an electric hand blender the potatoes become somewhat “slimy” (which is fine for a potato soup, but not for a potato mash!). Therefore never use electric help, but only your muscle power.

 

While the potatoes are boiling prepare some milk & whipping cream adding salt & pepper & nutmeg (freshly ground) & heat it (no boiling required!): this is the basic enrichment phase. The hot (!) milk mix will be added slowly to the potato mash; whisk until the mashed potatoes have the softness you like.
(Always use a hot milk mix: it’s better for combining than a cold (or even ice-cold) liquid.)

So we get a basic potato mash!

 

Next step:
We may add some more ingredients & flavors: let’s start with fennelized mashed potatoes!

We need a fennel bulb. The fennel bulb is finely sliced (use a mandolin slicer!) & reserve the fennel greens.

While preparing the basic mashed potatoes fry the fennel mess in some oil (peanut oil or any other oil w/o any taste of its own) until soft & starting to get brown.

Just add the fennel to the mashed potatoes & stir until well combined. Add some fennel greens for decoration.

 

Another alternative is a savory potato mash w/ onions & bacon.

Just chop the spring onions & the bacon & fry until soft & brown.

You may add the onion-bacon mess on top or combine it w/ the mashed potatoes. (If you prepare mashed potatoes in advance (for a dinner next day or so) I recommend to combine because it’s easier when reheating.)

 

potatoes: peeled, boiled, mashed, enriched...

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Servings: 3-4 or 8-10

potatoes: peeled, boiled, mashed, enriched...

Mashed potatoes: a no-brainer? Yes - it's easy, but heavenly delicious when home-made... (I think that's why you'll find again & again "how to do mashed potatoes!" on food blogs around the world...)

Ingredients

    for the basic potato mash:
  • 1500 gr floury potatoes (aka russet potatoes)
  • 250 ml milk
  • 250 ml whipping cream (32%)
  • about 1/4 tsp freshly ground nutmeg
  • salt & pepper
  • for fennelized potato mash:
  • 500 gr floury potatoes
  • 100 ml milk
  • 100 ml whipping cream (32%)
  • a pinch of freshly ground nutmeg
  • salt & pepper
  • 1/2 bulb of fennel
  • 1 tbsp oil
  • for potato mash w/ onions & bacon:
  • 500 gr floury potatoes
  • 100 ml milk
  • 100 ml whipping cream (32%)
  • a pinch of freshly ground nutmeg
  • salt & pepper
  • 3-4 spring onions
  • 40 gr bacon
  • equipment:
  • a potato masher
  • a wired whisk
  • a mandolin slicer

How to...

    for the basic potato mash:
  1. Peel the potatoes, wash them, cut them into pieces & boil them for about 15 min in salty water.
  2. Heat the mix of milk & whipping cream & add salt & pepper & nutmeg.
  3. Drain the potatoes & put them back in the hot pot.
  4. Mash the potatoes thoroughly.
  5. Add the hot milk mix step by step.
  6. Put the potato mash in a bowl for serving/reheating.
  7. for the fennelized potato mash:
  8. Prepare the basic potato mash.
  9. Slice the fennel bulb w/ a mandolin slicer.
  10. Fry the fennel in a pan w/ oil (w/o tart of its own) for about 10-15 min until the fennel is soft & starts browning.
  11. Add fennel to the potato mash.
  12. for the potato mash w/ onions & bacon:
  13. Prepare the basic potato mash.
  14. Chop spring onions & bacon.
  15. Fry the onions & the bacon in a pan for about 10-15 min until soft.
  16. Add the onion-bacon mess to the potato mash.

Notes

Prep Time: includes the preparation of the potatoes as well as the further ingredients (at the same time!) & the mashing & mixing.

Cook Time: boiling the potatoes & frying the further ingredients (at the same time!)

The basic potato mash from 1500 gr potatoes leads to 8-10 servings. (1500 gr is the standard potato bag I buy usually in my trusted food store.) Based on 500 gr potatoes (w/ additional ingredients) you'll get 3-4 servings. Meaning: if you plan a dinner for 4 start w/ 500 gr potatoes (assuming that there is a roast & 1-2 vegetable dishes in addition).

Milk & whipping cream: I recommend to prepare the mix generously. It depends on your personal taste if you like a more soft or a more stiff potato mash. It might even be that my quantities fall short of your preference of softness! If so don't hesitat to use more. However, always heat the milk mix!

The potato mash may be stored in the fridge for up to 3-4 days.

http://thebusinesswomanskitchen.de/potatoes-peeled-boiled-mashed-enriched/

(information on kitchen equipment)

 

Well: sometimes it happens that the floury potatoes don’t mutate into a totally creamy affair w/o any itsy-bitsy potato bits… either you didn’t crush & whisk long enough… or the floury potatoes weren’t floury enough…:

  • it’s obvious that it’s homemade & handmade(!)
  • it doesn’t influence the taste(!)
  • …& at least the photos show that it works well sometimes!

 

Milk? Whipping cream? Butter?
There’s a lot of stuff to make your mashed potatoes soft & softer… The basic approach is just using hot milk; you may add whipping cream for a more silken feeling on your tongue (& of course the flavor). My recommendation: don’t substitute milk 100% for whipping cream or even butter! The potato mash will become very rich & filling: that’s not appropriate for a roast companion!

 

You may prepare mashed potatoes in advance & reheat in a microwave. When reheated the potato mash tends to thickening so either you’ll prepare a very soft mash from the beginning or you’ll have to add some liquid at this point… (I always opt for the 1st alternative: it’s easier & faster!).

It doesn’t matter for the reheating if it’s a basic mash or an enhanced mash. Therefore mashed potatoes are a top solution for dinners w/ guests to accompany any roast: just prepare the mash a day before or so, put it in its final bowl (w/ lid & reassure that the bowl is microwave safe(!)) & put it in the microwave just before dinner is ready.

 

The businesswoman with too many office hours thinks

Basic mash: it’s always the same process & I can diversify by adding this & that…

Is it really easier just to grab a packet potato mash which needs only some water? Maybe, but the taste will be different.

I’ll definitely try the homemade mash because I can start anytime & reheat w/o loss of quality!

 

 

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